Adding Energy Efficiency to Your Home Construction or Remodelling Plan

The repair, maintenance and improvement market for UK housing is about 25 billion per year according to the Construction Products Association (CPA) economic forecasts. In fact, most homeowners are seeking energy efficient improvements as part of a larger home remodelling project according to CPA. There are a number of things you can do to enhance energy efficiency in your home during construction or remodelling.

Double glazed windows and loft and wall insulation
Put in double glazed windows to keep your home warmer, quieter and safer. You can also enhance the warmth and quiet by adding loft and wall insulation, which is much cheaper than replacing all your old windows with double glazed windows. Loft insulation is meant to stop heat from escaping through the roof while wall insulation prevents heat loss through walls. If you have solid walls, external wall insulation could be the best choice for retaining heat in your home. However, if your walls have a cavity, this can be filled up with insulation material to stop heat from conducting through the walls. Insulating your home can save you money on your fuel bills, and improves the energy efficiency rating of your home.

Energy saving appliances
Electrical appliances have made things like piles of dirty dishes very rare in most homes, and although they cost money to run there are tumble dryers, dishwashers, fridges, washing machines, ovens and other appliances that are incredibly energy efficient. For example, the Miele TMG840 WP heat pump dryer uses hot air to suck out moisture from clothes. The machine also switches off when its sensors detect that the clothes have dried.

Saving energy with the light bulb
Another way to enhance energy efficiency in your home is by installing LED light bulbs. Investing in the latest expensive LED light bulb could save you up to £240 each year according to an article in The Telegraph. You can also install smart LED lighting in your home to add to your list of control options instead of being restricted to on and off. For instance, the Lifx light bulb is compatible with the three main voice assistants, which means that you can control it with your voice. These lights also have apps that you can download on your phone and use to control the lights.

Energy saving appliances and light bulbs are reasonable options if you are renting or cannot afford extensive home remodelling projects at the moment. However, if you are constructing a new home, you can start making your home energy efficient from the moment the foundation is being laid.

Photo of a nest smart thermostat

“Smart” Thermostats

“Smart Tech” is becoming more of a household term across the world, and it’s quickly becoming an integral part of people’s lives. A lot of people use their phones for the majority of their daily lives, take for example the smart thermostat – we can now control the temperature of our homes from anywhere with an internet connection, with our phones. This includes using them to control other devices in conjunction with the thermostat.

Smart thermostats allow you to have a fine level of control over the heating in your home remotely from anywhere, they also allow you to have control over the hot water from your phone, both functions subsequently saving you money on your energy bills in the long run. These aren’t the only things that make smart thermostats “smart” though, they’re intuitive because they allow you to create schedules based on your personal preferences. If you don’t set one up, they ‘learn’ from how you use the thermostat and create a schedule automatically.

A lot of smart thermostats connect to weather stations over the internet and can automatically adjust your homes temperature based on the weather and humidity. They can also use motion sensors or geofencing to sense whether anyone is in the house, if not then they can set themselves to an “away mode” and save you energy by keeping energy use to a minimum while you’re out. A newer feature coming to many smart thermostats is the ability to adjust the temperature by room, this is called “zoned heating”, this could be useful if you need to keep a nursery warmer than the rest of the house for example but you would need the central heating system to be zoned to make this work.

Given that your thermostat will connect to your home’s wi-fi. it’d be silly if it didn’t offer some connectivity with other devices on the network. For those of you who aren’t familiar with it, there is an app out there called IFTTT (which stands for If This Then That), the app is used to create simple statements which form connections between different products or apps. There are lots of devices which are compatible with certain thermostats, I’ll write another blog about those next time, but as an example; if you own the Amazon Alexa, you can create a recipe which allows you to control the thermostat using your voice through the Alexa.

Pound Sign

The main upside of the smart thermostat is the fact that by combining all of these different features, a smart thermostat can help to save you money on your heating bills by automatically adjusting how much energy you’re using and when.

Renewable Heat Incentive.

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is the first government funded scheme of its type in the world, in the sense that it is the first long-term financial support programme for renewable heat. It’s an incentive from the government which is designed to reward people who use renewable energy to heat their buildings. This scheme was put in place to attempt to help us reach our goal of around 12% of heating coming from renewable energies.

  1. There are two phases of the scheme for this incentive: The first phase is for the non-domestic sector; the industrial, commercial, public sector and community organisations.AND
  2. One which is for residential dwellings. This one is expected to go live in 2014. The Renewable Heat Incentive will offer regular tariff payments for 7 years to people who choose to use certain technologies to heat their homes with. The amount of money which is paid depends on what technology is used to heat their homes, such as solar thermal water heating panels, heat pumps and biomass boilers (which use wood pellets, chips or logs).

Some of the technology which is eligible includes:

  • Air to water heat pumps.
  • Biomass – only boilers and biomass pellet stoves with back boilers.
  • Ground and water source heat pumps.
  • Flat plate and evacuated tube solar thermal panels.

The RHI is similar to the Feed-In Tariffs, which is a financial support scheme for people who create their own electricity. However, there are some massive differences between the two including:

  • This will be paid for by the Treasury rather than energy users.
  • There is no ‘National Grid for Heat’ so importing and exporting heat is irrelevant.
  • It will be introduced in phases, residential schemes will not be eligible until Phase 2, in 2014.

Written by Jade Turney – Building Tectonics Ltd.