Tips when choosing art for your walls.

Have you ever wanted to buy some artwork for your home, only to get overwhelmed, not knowing where to start? There is a lot on offer out there so I’m sure a lot of us have been in that predicament, which is why we’ve written this post, hopefully it will help you out next time you’re trying to choose. As I see it, there are two main perspectives I can come at this from – an emotionally based angle, and an objectively based angle. For the purposes of this post, we’ll assume that you have a room in mind for the piece, and that cost is irrelevant.

Firstly, I’d like to talk about the emotional aspects of what we can consider. We’re drawn to the things we like, so one of the first things we should really ask ourselves is “how does this make me feel?”, if you look at it and don’t get any emotional response, then it may not be the right piece for you. It should be something you’re proud to own and show off to other people, after all your own personality will be reflected in what you choose to buy and display but really, it has to be something you’d be happy to look at every day. If you spot a piece that grabs your attention, you should think about whether it not only grabs your attention initially, but continues to hold it. Personally I find that easier if the piece you choose is unique, a one of a kind piece as opposed to something mass produced, you know that you’re the only one who owns that particular piece and so you automatically feel more proud of it.

Once you’ve thought about all of that, and chosen a piece that you really connect with emotionally, thinking about this from an objective standpoint we should consider whether the piece is going to be a focal point, does the room already have a statement piece? Be that in the form of some art, some interesting furniture, an ornate mirror or even a grand chandelier. If you already have a focal piece in the room and only want one, then you should be looking at decor or accent pieces to complement the room as a whole. The colour of the piece will have a dramatic impact on the amount by which it fits into the space, unless you do want this to be the focal point of the room you don’t want it to stand out too much; you’d want it to almost blend in, just not to the point that it fades into the background. Every piece of art or decor we buy is for the purpose of enhancing a space, so you need to ask yourself how this piece will enhance the room you have in mind.

The size and shape of the artwork is something we automatically think about when looking for art, but I find that a lot of people forget about the impact the orientation will have as well. Consider the wallspace you have available, and whether a horizontal or vertical emphasis would fit into that better. If you have an abstract painting for example, it could go either way but the orientation will have an impact on how people view it, and how it makes them feel. You’d need to think practically about the weight if it’s a large framed painting, wall sculpture or something similar, and how you’re going to mount it in the space you have in mind. You wouldn’t want to mount something heavy on a plasterboard wall, the next time you go to view it it could have pulled some of the wall down under the weight!

When deciding on a piece of art, just try to remember that it may be a longer process than you initially thought. However, if you bear what we’ve said in mind, we think you’ll come to own a piece that you’d never regret owning.

After interior of a kitchen leading to living room.

Extended in Tattenhoe

Our client wanted to create a larger kitchen family area, and a space to sit with friends and enjoy the views over the sunnier side of the house. They’d already thought that converting the garage to livable space may be part of the answer, but our job was to show how the existing and new spaces could be satisfactorily connected together. The resulting scheme achieves a very spacious house, with rooms that allow for separate activities to take place without interference, but also when the time is right, the doors can be opened to allow the new spaces to fully interact. Large folding sliding doors to the garden also allow the outside spaces to be used in conjunction too.
Our client said the following:

“The design has also allowed for some flexibility in how we use our living spaces, which has meant that we have been able to make the most of the increased light coming from the bifold doors and velux windows. We’re delighted with the new living area and the vaulted ceiling has created even more of a spacious feel than we had anticipated”.

The client is extremely pleased with the end result, as are we. To have choices in the way you use space is nice to have, and even though it isn’t requested by clients, we’ll suggest this to clients in the future.

We had been recommended to this client by a previous client, which makes it so much more rewarding.

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